Milo, Maine

Milo is the largest town in the Three Rivers Community and the second largest town in Piscataquis County. Milo contains the three rivers of the community: Piscataquis River, Sebec River, and Pleasant River. The Sebec River flows through the center of Milo. Just before it goes under the West Main Street bridge, there are a set of falls with a dam sitting atop them known as Trafton's Falls, named for Mark Trafton who rode a raft over them.


Short History of Milo 
Portions from "A Short History of Milo" By Dr. Ralph C. Monroe 

Previous to the dawn of the nineteenth century, few white men had ever visited any of the territory now incorporated within the county of Piscataquis, and of these it is not believed that any had begun a permanent settlement. According to Rev. Amasa Loring's "History of Piscataquis County," Abel Blood began the first clearing in June, 1799, in what is now the township of DoverFoxcroft. It is also stated by good authority that Moses and Stephen Snow had been in Milo this same year, while their father, Phillip Snow, a hunter from Belgrade, had roamed over this entire section.

The town of Milo was first surveyed and plotted as township number three, in the seventh range north of the Waldo patent. It contained 21,920 acres of generally rolling or level land, watered by three beautiful rivers, which served the early settlers as thoroughfares for travel. Along the banks of these rivers the first homes of the settlers were built. The township was early purchased by Jonathan Hastings, to whom a certain Mr. Wells of Boston later became his partner. These two men sold the greater part of the land to the settlers and finally sold the remainder of the lots to Russell Kittredge of Bangor. The township was first divided into lots of 320 acres each by Park Holland of Bangor; later, in 1820, some of these lots were divided into lots of 100 acres each by Andrew Strong of Corinth; still later the portion south of the Piscataquis river by P. P. Furber, who was incidentally a prominent citizen here at that time.

The first man to make a permanent settlement and to bring his family here was Benjamin Sargent. He came from Methuen, Mass., where he had left his family and had taken passage on a schooner, landing at what is now Exchange Street, Bangor. Mr. Sargent was accompanied by his son Theophilus, a lad of fourteen years. Together they proceeded up the Penobscot in a boat which Mr. Sargent had secured. At the mouth of the Piscataquis they turned their boat up that stream and landed a little above the present ferry, which is about a mile from Derby. Here, on May 2,1802, they began the first permanent settlement in the town of Milo. They began at once to fell trees to make a clearing sufficiently large to plant enough corn for a smell crop. Here they erected on a little knoll a log cabin of two rooms. This was to be the home of the settler and his family.

When these things had been accomplished, Mr. Sargent returned to Methuen, leaving his son here in the wilderness to tend the crop until he should return in the fall with the rest of the family. Theophilus managed very well until one day, as tradition says, he went out leaving the door of his cabin open. While doing some work, a bear walked in and stole his molasses and some flour. The lad undoubtedly would have been destitute had it not been for a friendly tribe of Indians. These Indians were up this way getting bark for canoe building and saw the conditions of the white boy. The chief took pity on him and left his son, Ateon Oseon, to stay with Theophilus until his father returned.The first man to make a permanent settlement and to bring his family here was Benjamin Sargent. He came from Methuen, Mass., where he had left his family and had taken passage on a schooner, landing at what is now Exchange Street, Bangor. Mr. Sargent was accompanied by his son Theophilus, a lad of fourteen years. Together they proceeded up the Penobscot in a boat which Mr. Sargent had secured. At the mouth of the Piscataquis they turned their boat up that stream and landed a little above the present ferry, which is about a mile from Derby. Here, on May 2,1802, they began the first permanent settlement in the town of Milo. They began at once to fell trees to make a clearing sufficiently large to plant enough corn for a smell crop. Here they erected on a little knoll a log cabin of two rooms. This was to be the home of the settler and his family.The town of Milo was first surveyed and plotted as township number three, in the seventh range north of the Waldo patent. It contained 21,920 acres of generally rolling or level land, watered by three beautiful rivers, which served the early settlers as thoroughfares for travel. Along the banks of these rivers the first homes of the settlers were built. The township was early purchased by Jonathan Hastings, to whom a certain Mr. Wells of Boston later became his partner. These two men sold the greater part of the land to the settlers and finally sold the remainder of the lots to Russell Kittredge of Bangor. The township was first divided into lots of 320 acres each by Park Holland of Bangor; later, in 1820, some of these lots were divided into lots of 100 acres each by Andrew Strong of Corinth; still later the portion south of the Piscataquis river by P. P. Furber, who was incidentally a prominent citizen here at that time.

To read more: A Short History of Milo

If you would like to know more about the history of Milo, please visit the Milo Historical Society.


Derby, Maine 

Derby is the section of Milo that grew up around the Bangor and Aroostook RailRoad's shops. It was originally known as Milo Junction, but the name was changed over time. Derby used to be a bustling community with stores, schools,hotels, and even a post office. Today, Derby does not have any of these. The railroad and shops still remain, but the stores and hotels are gone.


Portions from "The Building of Derby" 
Compiled by C.K. Ellison 

Up here in the southeast corner of Piscataquis County is located Milo Junction. Previous to the past year very little has ever been heard of Milo Junction other that it was a junction point for the Bangor & Aroostook trains and also that it was a most dismal place in which to wait for trains. There was nothing here other than a railroad station which was destroyed by fire and has been rebuilt: one water tank, a coal shed and a gloomy looking dwelling house completing the architectural part of the place. It was one of the smallest settlements in the country and was one of the quietest.

Today things assume an entirely different aspect here. The new rail station which was completed last year or more ago to replace the one burned is a large comfortable depot with roomy waiting rooms, good sized ticket offices and neat and roomy baggage rooms and out houses. This is not all by any means for it is Milo Junction that the second largest car shops and repair works in New England are being built by the Bangor & Aroostook Railroad Co. Not only are the car shops and repair works under the process of construction but a good-sized village is being erected by a multitude of carpenters and masons in the employ of the railroad company.

Milo Junction is the center of activity in Piscataquis County. Over 400 machinists, carpenters, painters, masons and common laborers are employed from early morning till late at night in an effort to get the work completed at as early date as possible.

The dwelling houses which are being built are for the housing of the numberless employees of the railroad company who will be employed here after the repair shops are constructed and in use. At the present time 47 homes are in the process of construction. These houses are neat, well built, comfortable looking structures and are to be supplied with all the modern conveniences consistent to their location. They will be painted the same color and when finished will make a very modern and neat looking settlement. In addition to these houses for the use of employees a fine 40 room hotel will be built. This hotel will furnish accommodations for those who are not in a position to occupy the dwelling houses on the railroad company's property. This hotel will like the houses be thoroughly up-to-date in every respect.

For the benefit and amusement of the employees a good sized and attractive casino will be constructed. This will give the employees and their families an excellent opportunity to spend their evenings and thus break the monotony of life away from the city. A modern school building will be built and last but by no means least a church where services will be held. In short it will, when finished be a very comfortable little village in which to live.

To read more: The Building of Derby